Showing posts with label Sherri Belassen. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Sherri Belassen. Show all posts

Saturday, October 10, 2015

Divine Bovines are Udderly Wonderful at Wilde Meyer!

By Judy Feldman | www.wildemeyer.com

Growing Pains  24″ x 48″
Sarah Webber
Wilde Meyer artists tend to like animals. It’s not at all unusual to see images of dogs, horses and even chimpanzees when you walk into any of their galleries. But, this month, some other animals will be prominently displayed in Scottsdale at the first “Divine Bovine” show.

Here, you’ll see all sorts of bovine art: cows, buffalo, bison and yaks. At least 25 artists are participating in this themed show. Some of the artists, like Bill Colt and Sarah Webber, have favored painting bovines for quite a while.

Onlookers  18″ x 24″
Bill Colt
Lily Fair  24″ x 20″
Bill Colt

How Now Brown Cow  30″ x 30″
Judy Feldman
For some, like me, it’s a first time we’ve painted a bovine. I don’t know why I never thought of it before, because I do think cows are beautiful, especially their expressive, heavily lashed eyes. I thoroughly enjoyed painting “How Now Brown Cow,” and I really did feel a bond with this lovely creature!

Small in a Fuzi Dream 18″ x 18″
Linda Carter Holman
Linda Carter Holman has a personal relationship with the subject of her painting, entitled “Small in a Fuzi Dream.” The yak belongs to her! Linda has incorporated images that recur in her other paintings, such as the goldfish and the charming female figure, along with her typical color palette.

As a matter of fact, you can probably identify the artists of many paintings. Although the subject may be new, our styles still come through! Sherri Belassen’s “Retro Vache” definitely reflects her technique and choice of hues. Connie Townsend’s “Red” has the same crazy expression you see in many of her driving dogs. And, of course, Trevor Mikula has come up with a witty way of showing his cows in “Heads or Tails!”

Retro Vache 60″ x 72″
Sherri Belassen

Red 24″ x 30″
Connie Townsend
Heads or Tails 24″ x 24″
Trevor Mikula

Yak Yak Yak  30″ x 17″ x 16″
Barbara Duzan
Buffalo Past
Adriana Walker
The show is not only about paintings. Adriana Walker has Necklace and earring sets (show Buffalo Past). Kathryn Blackmun has created a turquoise bison ornament and a bison plate, and there are sculptures by Carol Ruff Franza (Prairie Thunder”), Kari Rives (“Sky Cow”) and “Yak Yak Yak” by Barbara Duzan.


So, stop by during October and see this fun show. You never know, you might fall in love with a cow, a buffalo or even a yak!

You can see more art from Divine Bovine at Wilde Meyer.

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Happy Anniversary, Wilde Meyer!


Fire Passage mixed media on canvas 36"x48"
by Charles Davison
November marks Wilde Meyer Gallery's 28th anniversary! In 1983, when Scottsdale was known as “the West’s most western town,” Betty Wilde and Mark Meyer moved here from Tulsa, Oklahoma. “We had a gallery in Tulsa, but we wanted to move, and Scottsdale had a good art market, both from tourists and year-round residents,” Betty said.

They opened their gallery just across from the current site on Marshall Way. At the time, the other galleries were located on Main Street, and they were the first to have an art venue on this part of Marshall Way, aside from Elaine Horwitz, at the other end. A few years after they opened, Jonathan Henderson joined Betty and Mark as a partner in the gallery.

View from the Rim
oil on canvas 48"x60"
by Barbara Gurwitz

The Present oil on canvas, 41"x41"
Jacqueline Rochester
At first, they brought in artists they represented in Tulsa, but soon after, artists from the area came to the gallery. Some of the early artists are still represented by Wilde Meyer today, including Linda Carter Holman, Charles Davison and Barbara Gurwitz.  I’ve been with the gallery since 2005, and it still thrills me to be included with the wonderful artists who show here.

In the early years, Wilde Meyer consulted with many corporations in the area, assisting them in purchasing art for their offices. First Interstate Bank was a large client, and hung original art in its executive offices, bank branches and operations center. Business gradually evolved into residential clients – both designers and private collectors.
Virgin of Love  36"x36"
by Linda Carter Holman

Garden Wall, (1984)
By Linda Carter Holman
Another Wilde Meyer gallery opened in Tucson in 2000, in the beautiful Foothills area at Skyline Drive and Campbell. And, if you’re lucky enough to spend time at the nearby Canyon Ranch Spa, you’ll see many Wilde Meyer artists’ work displayed on the walls there, available for purchase.


Wilde Meyer Gallery, Tucson
Colores, located on Main Street, is the gallery’s third space, and features art, as well as jewelry and clothing

When you enter a Wilde Meyer gallery, your first impression is usually “Wow! What amazing colors!”  We are a collection of artists who love to paint and use strong color whenever possible. Some of the work is figurative; some abstract - but, for the most part, color plays a major role in every piece of art. Most of us are animal lovers, too, so you’ll see anything from dogs to horses, cats, monkeys and even elephants in paintings and sculptures.

Ranchero (2007) 72"x36"
by Sherri Belassen

Species From the Undiscovered Continent
48"x72" acyrlic on canvas
by Timothy Chapman
It’s fun to hang out at a Wilde Meyer gallery. Betty furnishes them with interesting pieces from China, and other accessories to make the gallery feel more like a home. The bright colors and creative art make people want to linger. The artwork is moved around from one gallery to another, so you’ll always see something different when you return.

As a way of giving back to the communities that support them, Wilde Meyer has always been involved in charitable endeavors. The gallery helps the Arizona Cancer Center select a painting each year, donated by the artist, as the key piece in their fundraiser’s live auction. I was honored to be selected by the organization last year, and attended their wonderful event at the Phoenician Resort. Since Betty and Mark both love animals, they have worked with such charities as Equine Voices in Tucson and Southwest Wildlife, among others, donating art, furniture and jewelry for fundraisers.

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Tucson Rocks, Wilde Meyer Too!!

"Bad Boy Jacket: Cool"  mixed media on canvas 46"x46"
by Melinda Hall

"Seranade" oil on canvas 12"x12"
by Linda Carter Holman
Wilde Meyer Gallery presents our “Tucson Rocks” event, “Wilde Interpretations of Rock and Roll: The ‘50s to the Present,” a group art exhibition featuring art that captures the mood and feeling brought about by music and Rock showing October 6, 2011 through October 28, 2011.

"Tucson Rocks" is community-wide programming that celebrates "Who Shot Rock and Roll, A Photographic History" an exhibition opening at the Tucson Museum of Art on October 23, 2011.This exhibition originated at the Brooklyn Museum of Art and has traveled to several museums  across the country including Akron Art Museum in Ohio, Birmingham Museum of Art in Alabama, Columbia Museum of Art in South Carolina, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in Tennessee and others.  It's the first major museum exhibition to focus on the photographers who captured and portrayed Rock and Roll in photographs.



"Unplugged"  oil on canvas 20"x16"
by Connie Townsend
Just as Rock and Roll means different things to different people, artists at Wilde Meyer visualize their ideas through paintings.

Linda Carter Holman captures the festive mood as a singing guitarist travels with an audience of animal companions. 

For those who like art with humor, Trevor Mikula and Connie Townsend portray animals bearing musical instruments or wearing punk-rock outfits.  

Energetic paintings of people absorbed in a concert can be seen in the expressive scenes by Monika Rossa. 

Rock music’s effect on the body is shown in the beauty of dance, seen in stylized figure paintings by Sherri Belassen. 

Ryan Hale and Melinda Hall create paintings of paraphernalia and iconic objects of Rock in their still lives of guitars or leather jackets. 

Paintings by Bill Colt and Robert Ransom recall the early years of the rock and roll spirit in vintage caddies and hot rod roadsters.
 
“Wilde Interpretations of Rock and Roll: The ‘50s to the Present” opens on Thursday, October 6, 2011 at our gallery in Tucson and continues through October 29, 2011.

"Be There Or" reverse glass painting with vintage window 28"x30"
by Melinda Curtin
 

Monday, April 4, 2011

"Live in Color"


The latest show at Wilde Meyer, "Live in Color" opened on Thursday, March 31st and features new work by Sherri Belassen and Ryan Hale.

Left: Sherri Belassen  "At What Cost"  oil on canvas 60" x 36"
Right: Ryan Hale "Go West" acrylic on canvas  60" x 72"


Ryan creates his abstract paintings with drywall and palette knives, using mainly red and ochre tones. He pairs these colors against each other to see how they’ll interact. His work looks spontaneous, but, actually, he says he’s very methodical, applying his paint thoughtfully and changing directions as the piece comes together.

Ryan told me that he’s influenced by aerial photography! Plots of developed areas coinciding with undeveloped land, roads and buildings all inspire his geometric compositions. His painting entitled “Through the City” implies the congestion and energy of city life. My eyes rest on the white form in the center, but all around shapes are colliding.
Ryan Hale "Through the City" acrylic on canvas 60" x 48"

In “Building Up,” he contrasts organized linear “roads” with the chaos of free-floating patches of color.
Ryan Hale  "Building Up" acrylic on canvas  48" x 36"

Sherri paints with gusto and a free, yet strong style. Her work is all about the paint – the subject is there to help her explore and show many levels of colors and textures. For example, in “Splash” she uses large blocks of color to create interesting geometric shapes around the figure of a diver, whose body is defined by layers of paint scraped away to reveal another multitude of colors underneath.
Sherri Belassen  "Splash"  oil on canvas  48" x 30"

 It’s a very effective technique, used in most of her paintings.  Many of the titles of Sherri’s work convey irony and humor, as in “At What Cost."
Sherri Belassen  "At What Cost?" oil on canvas  60" x 36"
 

This is a strong show, with two painters who have contributed very interesting paintings.
Left: Ryan Hale  "Past Futures"  acrylic on canvas  36" x 72"
Right: Sherri Belassen "Olas Surfers" oil on canvas 36" x 48"

Left:  Ryan Hale  "Thoughts Abound"  Warming Day: I, II, III
(Right) Ryan Hale, 6 pieces: Warming Day: I, II, III  & Late Afternoon I, II, III

Sherri Belassen  "Play"  oil on canvas 48" x 72"


"Live in Color" continues through April 16, 2011.

Our next show will be at our gallery in Tucson: a group show featuring art by Alix Stefan, Robert Anderson, Sarah Webber, Michael Baum, Chaille Trevor and Judith D'Agostino called "Nature's Visual Poetry," opening on April 14, 2011, 5-7pm.

Monday, February 14, 2011

Valentine's Day Blog Launch


Happy Valentine's Day and welcome to Wilde Meyer Gallery's new blog! 


At Wilde Meyer Gallery, we say we are "About the Art" and that's because we are very passionate about art and believe in the artists we represent. With that said and to inaugurate this blog in the spirit of Valentines day, here is some art that reflects the occasion.



Linda Carter Holman  "Love Bird"  print on paper (image size, 5"x4")
contact us or visit our online store ColoresAz for more info; also available framed.


Sue Goldsand  "Heart, Purple and Red"  fused glass  7.5" x 7" x 1"


Sherri Belassen  "Sweet Secrets"  oil on canvas  30"x15"

Chaille Trevor  "Caring"  oil on canvas  36"x30"


Robert Charon "Red Passion" mixed media on panel 48" x 72"

Melinda Hall  "Three Hearts in Line"  oil and mixed media on canvas  7.25" x 7.25"