Showing posts with label Chaille Trevor. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Chaille Trevor. Show all posts

Friday, May 30, 2014

Collecting 101

(actually, Collecting more than 100)

By Judy Feldman | www.wildemeyer.com

Collecting original art can be a bit stressful for first-time buyers. You can walk into a gallery and be overwhelmed by choices of styles, subjects, colors and sizes. The prices, too, can be out of reach for some would-be collectors.

Betty Wilde, one of Wilde Meyer Gallery’s owners, said that gallery visitors are often afraid to make their first purchase. But, she tells them, “Buy your first piece, and you’ll be hooked on original art. Posters won’t do it for you anymore!”

Some people are initially convinced that they have to purchase art that matches their d├ęcor. Betty tells them that their tastes will come through in their selection. “Chances are, you’ll gravitate to colors that you like anyway. Choose what you like, and what you’ll enjoy living with in your home.”

Betty has found a way for art lovers to dip their toes into the wonderful world of art collecting, and helping animal charities at the same time. During the month of June, the gallery at Marshall Way will host a “100 for $100” show. More than 40 artists are participating, and each painting will sell for $100, with much of the proceeds going to several animal charities.

“It’s a great way to get to know many different artists,” Betty said. “It’s always easy to find a place for a small painting, and at this price, you can even make a grouping of several paintings without spending too much.”

Many of the paintings have been created by the artists expressly for this show; others, including Jamie Ellsworth and Chaille Trevor, have included larger paintings as well, because they want to help the charities.

Last year, the show was so successful, that the gallery will be selling more than 100 paintings through a lottery system. The images will be emailed to all of you next week; you can put your name on a list for a particular painting, and a name will be drawn for each painting on Friday, June 5. This is your chance to start (or continue) collecting!

Thursday, January 2, 2014

WILDE MEYER Celebrates 30 Years of Art

By Judy Feldman | www.wildemeyer.com

On November 7th, Wilde Meyer celebrated its 30th anniversary at its Marshall Way gallery with a party for clients, artists and “art walkers.” It was fun for me to meet some of the artists I’ve spoken with on the phone during blog interviews. I met Ka Fisher, Charles Davison and Chaille Trevor. Nancy Pendleton and Brian Boner also came for the occasion. Mark, Laura, Jonathan, Ryan, Tyler and Andrea were all there to chat with everyone while we enjoyed a delicious anniversary cake.

If you don’t already know, Wilde Meyer is named for owners Betty Wilde and Mark Meyer. Betty’s son Jonathan Henderson, also is a partner.

Since Betty wasn’t able to attend (she was at the WM party in Tucson), I decided to give her a call to congratulate her on this milestone and learn a little more about the gallery’s history. I didn’t know that Betty has a BFA in fine art, and that she had a gallery in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

In 1983, Betty and Mark came to Scottsdale and opened a gallery on Marshall Way, just across the street from their current location. They brought some artists’ work from Tulsa, but quickly, other artists applied to have their work exhibited. Over the years, the gallery has had several locations on Marshall Way. Betty said that their present location used to be a veterinarian and dog clinic. Instead of art walks, Thursday nights were for dog training classes! Wilde Meyer moved into this space in 1990. Wilde Meyer Annex, their other gallery in Scottsdale, has also had several previous locations, but has been at the Main Street site since 1997. It’s a fun place to shop, with colorful art, jewelry, gift items and some “arty”clothing.

Quite a few Wilde Meyer’s artists have been with the gallery for many years. Linda Carter Holman and Charles Davison have been represented here since its inception. Barbara Gurwitz came a little later. Sherri Belassan, Timothy Chapman, Ka Fisher, Alix Stefan and Nancy Pendleton have been showing their art here for 10 to 15 years. And, I’ve been with Wilde Meyer since 2006!

The year 2000 marked the opening of the beautiful Wilde Meyer gallery in Tucson. We artists are fortunate to have these three venues for our work to be displayed. And, sometimes, we’re featured on the walls of the Canyon Ranch Spa.

But no matter which locale you visit, you’ll find the contemporary, colorful art that characterizes Wilde Meyer. Whether it’s paintings that portray everything from landscapes to amazing chimpanzees or art glass, ceramics or sculpture, the recurring motif is quality art that pleases the eye.

Betty told me that owning art galleries is a fascinating endeavor, certainly not without its challenges. But she, Mark and Jonathan are looking forward to a bright future. “Both visitors and local residents in these two cities enjoy and support art, and we feel very fortunate to be in this business.”

Monday, January 21, 2013

Wilde (Meyer) Horses

By Judy Feldman | www.wildemeyer.com

Most figurative artists tend to have favorite subjects to portray, whether it’s people, still life, landscapes or animals. When the horse is the focus, it’s pretty certain that the artist who created that painting is an equine lover and a rider.

Chaille's grandfather, Ed Tweed, with his imported champion stallion *Orzel
(Photo courtesy of Chaille Trevor.)
It seems that the most beautiful horse paintings are done by people who are really passionate about these animals. They ride all the time and know their horses so well, that they can really show their spirit and even their soul – just look at the eyes, and you will see an amazing sensitivity.

Chaille astride the champion Arabian stallion
Brusally Gwiazdor, at the gates of Brusally Ranch. 
(Photo courtesy of Chaille Trevor.)
After the Ride by Chaille Trevor
Chaille Trevor is equally committed to her horses and her art. She divides her time between riding and painting. Chaille has a unique lineage in the horse world – her grandfather owned Brusally Ranch and was a major breeder of Arabian horses. He also was the creator, along with Anne McCormick and Philip Wrigley, of the well–known Scottsdale Arabian Horse show that will have its 58th annual show this February at West World.

“My grandfather imported 26 Arabian horses from Poland, and I still have some horses from that breeding,” Chaille said.


Chaille with some of her grandfather's imported Arabian mares.
(Photo courtesy of Chaille Trevor.)
After getting an art degree at ASU, Chaille’s grandfather invited her to live and work at his ranch. She stayed there for 17 years, training and showing his horses. When I spoke to Chaille, I really felt that she has a deep connection to her horses. This special affinity is what gives her paintings their grace and energy. “Love,” a 36”x48” painting that was recently featured in Phoenix Home & Garden, depicts the close bond between a mare named Panatela and her little niece, Tess.

Love 36"x48" oil on canvas
by Chaille Trevor


Chaille's beloved mare Brusally Orzyna
(Photo by Heather Buttrum www.heatherbuttrum.com.)
Chaille’s paintings could be interpreted as a metaphor of the relationship between a horse and its rider. “If a horse trusts his rider, the two become as one, with the horse always willing to please,” she explained. “As an avid rider, I know my horses’ movements – as well as their faces and bodies -  and I try to portray that in my paintings.”

Free Spirits 12"x24" oil on canvas
by Chaille Trevor
Movement and energy are the themes in “Free Spirit,” The position of the horses’ legs, the way they hold their heads, and the dust kicked up defy the static limits of a painting, and they seem to come right towards the viewer.

A Gentle Life  30" x 24" oil on canvas
by Chaille Trevor

Chaille’s paintings have a sketch quality to them. She feels that technique enables her to “go deeper and deeper to get closer to what you feel about the subject and to express yourself.” “High Spirits” is a good example of this style. But I have to say that my favorite painting is “A Gentle Life.” When I look at this horse’s beautiful head with its soulful eye and delicate muzzle, I just want to wrap my arms around it. Chaille has spoken of her love for this horse to me through this painting.

His Prize 36"x48" oil on canvas
by Chaille Trevor

A Place of Peace 24"x30" oil on canvas
by Chaille Trevor

Wild Spirit 48"x72" oil on canvas
by Chaille Trevor
If you happen to be at the Wilde Meyer Gallery in Tucson, ask to speak to Betty Wilde. She’s a devoted horse lover, and would love to speak to you about the Wilde (Meyer) horses!

Thanks to Tobi Lopez Taylor of Coronado Ranch Sport Horses for contributing photos and information to this post.  Follow Brusally Ranch Appreciation Society on Facebook where you can learn a lot more about  Ed Tweed's contributions to Domestic, Polish, and Russian Arabian horse breeding. A book about Chaille's family's Arabian horse breeding program will be published by Screenfold Press in 2013. Titled The Polish and Russian Arabians of Ed Tweed's Brusally Ranch, by Tobi Lopez Taylor, the book presents a history of the ranch and discusses Tweed's 27 imported horses individually. Each chapter features a four-generation pedigree, historic photographs, extracts from documents in the Brusally Ranch archives, and an annotated list of offspring. The book will be available through Amazon.com.

Please visit www.wildemeyer.com to see more of Chaille's paintings.


Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Nature's Visual Poetry

Wilde Meyer’s current show at its Tucson Gallery is entitled “Nature’s Visual Poetry.” This group show features six of the gallery’s artists, each of whom has a unique interpretation of nature’s forms and landscapes.

Four of the artists paint en plein air using settings in Wyoming, New Mexico and Arizona for their inspiration. The mood they felt while capturing the scene affects each painting. For example, Michael Baum expresses the solitude of the Western landscape at early dusk in “Desert Evening.” Everything is soft in the golden twilight, but the place seems far, far away.
Michael Baum  "Desert Evening" oil on panel 22" x 25.5"


Wildflowers ascend toward distant, mysterious mountains in “Outside of Taos,” Robert Anderson’s dreamlike landscape. Using thick paint and neutral tones, he creates a mood that’s calming, yet thought-provoking. An excellent craftsman, Robert made the frame for "Outside of Taos" himself and divided the scene in three parts as a triptych, which I think makes it very interesting.
Robert Anderson "Outside of Taos, NM" oil on panel  13" x 19.75"


In Judith d’Agostino’s “Lakeside” painting, the weather is changing, and so is the mood.  The sun-kissed orange mountains and fluffy white clouds will soon be overtaken by an ominous black cloud, already casting a dark shadow on the trees. It’s a powerful scene.
Judith D'Agotstino "Lakeside" oil on panel 29.5"x53.5"


Alix Stefan paintings are journeys into the Sonoran desert. She pictures it as a paradise, abundant with ocotillo, saguaro or organ pipe cactus that rise above colorful fields of flowers, prickly pear and other native plants. In “I Love the Rain,” the subdued color palette and beautiful rendering of the sky make me feel as if I can smell the wet desert scents.
Alix Stefan "I love the Rain" acrylic on canvas  26"x32"


The other two artists choose animal subjects to express their love of nature.

Sarah Webber’s painterly portraits of animals conveys their particular personalities  – as they appear to her. According to Sarah, whether it’s “the color of a nose, the spark in the eyes, the thickness of fur or the curve of an ear, there has to be one thing I wish to say with my paint that will reach out and touch the viewer.” You can certainly see her intentions in the painting of the rabbit below, entitled “Secret Bunny.”
Sarah Webber "Secret Bunny"  19"x17" oil on canvas


As an artist and lifelong horse trainer, Chaille Trevor’s equine paintings are unique in the intimacy and sensitivity. She depicts various aspects of horses’ personalities, from the gentleness of how they groom each other to the sheer power, spirit and grace of a horse in movement. The two horses in this painting seem to be communicating, their heads titled slightly inward and their bodies trotting in unison.
Chaille Trevor  "Kissed by the Sun"  oil on canvas  36" x 48"
If you happened to miss any of the shows, send us an email and we can get you more images of available works by featured artists.

I hope everyone is ready to spoil mom on Mother's Day on May 8th. If not, we'll throw out a few ideas so check back with us soon!

Monday, March 21, 2011

"Wild Spirits"


Our latest show opened on March 17 with works by Chaille Trevor and Leigh Gusterson. Both artists show a passion for their subject matter – Leigh in her imaginative depiction of New Mexico scenes; and Chaille in her love of horses.

Leigh throws local color out the window; instead she paints what she feels: vivid blues, hot pinks and purples for the majestic mountains and still other bright colors for the fields. Old cars, sheep in 2-D (they kind of look like flat marshmallows with legs); a rustic cabin with a turquoise refrigerator outside are some of the images Leigh uses in her very personalized landscapes. She has an exuberant style and applies her paint generously.

Leigh Gusterson "Sheep with Turquoise Fridge" oil on canvas 21" x 21"

Leigh Gusterson "Sheep in the Junkyard" oil on canvas 25" x 35"


Chaille’s painting technique often involves sketching on the canvas first and then applying her paint thinly to produce a translucent, expressive style. Her work shows her knowledge and deep love of horses. She’s been training and showing Arabian horses for many years, and she invites us to know her subjects on an intimate level. For example, in the painting below, the horse looks at the viewer directly and evokes a very emotional response. 

Chaille Trevor "At Attention" 48" x 36" oil on canvas
An equally sensitive painting shows a mare and her colt leaning in towards each other, and we cannot help but feel the close bond between them.
Chaille Trevor "A Day in Spring" oil on canvas 36" x 48"

Don’t rush through his show! Each painting provides a wonderful moment of viewing pleasure!  

Below are a couple of photos from the exhibition:
Left: Chaille Trevor "His Prize" oil on canvas 36" x 48"
Right: Leigh Gusterson "Sheep in the Junkyard" oil on canvas 25" x 35"

Left: Chaille Trevor "Kissed by the Sun" oil on canvas 36" x 48"
Right: Leigh Gusterson "Dinner for Four"22"x28";
"Drive up into the Mountains"20"x20"; "Three on Llano" 16"x28"






 
"Wild Spirits" shows March 17, 2011 through March 30, 2011.

The next show is "Live in Color". It features Sherri Belassen and Ryan Hale and starts on Thursday, March 31st. We'll be getting new work by Ryan and Sherri soon, so send us an email for a preview.

Monday, February 14, 2011

Valentine's Day Blog Launch


Happy Valentine's Day and welcome to Wilde Meyer Gallery's new blog! 


At Wilde Meyer Gallery, we say we are "About the Art" and that's because we are very passionate about art and believe in the artists we represent. With that said and to inaugurate this blog in the spirit of Valentines day, here is some art that reflects the occasion.



Linda Carter Holman  "Love Bird"  print on paper (image size, 5"x4")
contact us or visit our online store ColoresAz for more info; also available framed.


Sue Goldsand  "Heart, Purple and Red"  fused glass  7.5" x 7" x 1"


Sherri Belassen  "Sweet Secrets"  oil on canvas  30"x15"

Chaille Trevor  "Caring"  oil on canvas  36"x30"


Robert Charon "Red Passion" mixed media on panel 48" x 72"

Melinda Hall  "Three Hearts in Line"  oil and mixed media on canvas  7.25" x 7.25"