Showing posts with label Ryan Hale. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ryan Hale. Show all posts

Friday, September 2, 2016

What Fuels our Creativity?

By Judy Feldman | www.wildemeyer.com

I just finished reading an amusing book called “Steal Like an Artist,” by Austin Kleon. On one of the first pages, he says “What a good artist understands is that nothing comes from nowhere. All creative work builds on what came before. Nothing is completely original.”

Treats
36" x 48" oil on canvas
Judy Feldman
Afternoon at the Cote d'Azur
40" x 30"  oil on canvas
Judy Feldman
Almost all artists have their muses, and I think it’s so interesting to see how artists can take inspiration from work they admire, and then incorporate certain elements into their own uniq...ue style. I also believe that inspiration comes from the subconscious, from experiences we’ve had and places we’ve been during our lives.

For me, it’s always been the post-Impressionists – especially Matisse! I admire his amazing use of color, his disregard for the rules of perspective, and his emphasis on his reactions to what he saw, and how he transmitted those feelings in his paintings. Can you see his influence in my painting called “Treats?” Other painters, such as Bonnard and Gabrielle Munter also have inspired me. I’ve spent quite a bit of time in France, and I think that this, too, shows up in my paintings, such as “Afternoon at the Cote d’Azur.”


Following this theme of influences, I phoned a few Wilde Meyer artists to see who their muses were. Here are their responses:

Ryan Hale said his biggest influence is the work of the abstract expressionist Mark Rothko. “I particularly like his color field paintings, he explained. “I agree with his theory that color can expressfeeling, and admire his technique of painting thin, then building up layers to create soft, as well as defined areas.” You can see Rothko’s influence in Ryan’s painting entitled “Earthbound.”

Earthbound
60" x 48" acrylic on canvas
Ryan Hale
Ryan is very interested in aerial imagery, and he refers to maps to provoke ideas about “where civilization ends and nature takes over.” He likes to play with the contrast of organic, unorganized shapes, contrasted with the geometric restraints of the city grids. He explained, “I’m trying to organize chaos.” I think that “The Elements of Nature” expresses this effort.

Elements of Nature
48" x 48" acrylic on canvas
Ryan Hale

Barnett Newman is another muse to Ryan. He, too, is known for his color field paintings. According to Wikipedia, “His paintings are existential in tone and content, explicitly composed with the intention of communicating a sense of locality, presence and contingency.” Newman’s influence appears to me in Ryan’s painting entitled “The City Sunset.

The City Sunset
60" x 72" acrylic on canvas
Ryan Hale

Sushe Felix lives in Colorado. Her southwest landscapes have a distinctive style, which she claims is derived from her interest in American abstract painters from the 1930’s and 40s, as well as the modernist and cubist movements. “In particular, I’ve been influenced by Raymond Jonson, who led the Transcendental Painting Group in Santa Fe,” Sushe explained.

Summer Afternoon 
 20.5 " x 20.5" acrylic on panel
Sushe Felix 
I looked up the group on Google, and discovered that the aim of the Transcendental Painting Group was "to defend, validate and promote abstract art. They sought to carry painting beyond the appearance of the physical world, through new expressions of space, color, light and design."

Sunlit Canyon 
29.5" x 35.5" acrylic on panel
Sushe Felix



Thomas Hart Benton, who was at the forefront of the Regionalist movement, also influenced Sushe, as did the southwest regionalist painters, who took the local landscape and abstracted it. She has her own spin on this inspiration, with a strong focus on forms, shapes and color. You can see her unique style in these paintings, entitled “Summer Afternoon” and “Sunlit Canyon.” Sushe has a favorite color palette, using strong complementary colors to draw attention to areas of interest for her.


Oranges I
30 " x 22" acrylic on paper
Rudie van Brussel
Rudie van Brussel’s artistic inspiration stems from his very interesting background. He grew up in Surinam, originally a Dutch colony in South America. Although he was first educated in a Dutch school, he was greatly affected by the deep colors of the tropics. Imagine Vermeer and Rembrandt in South America! When Surinam became independent, Rudie and his family moved to the United States, and Rudie attended ASU, obtaining a degree in engineering. But, that was not satisfying, and so after traveling the world, he starting painting, recalling the images and memories of his island life.

Fruit Table
 45" x 61" oil on canvas
Rudie van Brussel

“Fruit Table” shows Rudie’s love of color, tempered by a soft layer of shading that reflects the influence of the Dutch masters. In another series, instead of the formal portraits done by the Old Masters, Rudie has chosen to paint animal portraits in a formal, yet whimsical style.  I think Rudie also has been influenced by the magical realism of South America, when I look at his somewhat surreal paintings such as “Feathers” and “Tumbler.” As I said previously, our inspiration often springs from our subconscious – a mix of current and past experiences.


Tumbler
53" x 36" acrylic on canvas
Rudie van Brussel
Feathers
48" x 36" oil on canvas
Rudie van Brussel

I think we all have muses in our lives – people we admire and who inspire us in our pursuits, artistic or otherwise. And, someday, we may be an inspiration to someone else!

You can see more work by Rudie van Brussel, Sushe Felix, Ryan Hale, and Judy Feldman at Wilde Meyer Gallery.

Monday, September 8, 2014

What’s Your Visual Language?

By Judy Feldman | www.wildemeyer.com

Every artist has his or her visual language – sometimes it’s figurative, sometimes it’s not. I must confess, I’ve been avoiding this blog topic for quite a while. You see, I enjoy looking at most abstract art, but as a figurative painter, I find it hard to comprehend how it’s done.

One way to find out is to talk to some abstract artists! I made some calls, and our conversations were quite interesting. My take-away from talking to these three people is that abstract art is fun to make…but it still intimidates me!

Zuni Pueblo by Jack Roberts, acrylic on canvas 50 x 70 inches

Jack Roberts is an accomplished, mature artist who has been creating abstract paintings for quite some time. He strives to create a visual sensation, rather than a pictorial reference. “Abstract art is not derivative of representational painting,” he said. “It’s something all itself.

“When I paint, it’s more about the paint and the composition. I like pushing color and shape buttons to stir the viewer’s visual emotions,” he explained.

Honaki by Jack Roberts,
acrylic on canvas 50 x 70 inches
I’m a person who thrives on color, so I’m very drawn to Jack’s paintings. As you can see in his painting entitled “Zuni Pueblo,” his colors are very clear; he mixes beautiful opaques with jewel-toned transparent hues.

Jack works on a large canvas, on a flat surface. He says he likes to paint wet-on-wet, so the paint is always moving. He uses many different implements, from plastic spatulas to push brooms and house paint brushes. A garden hose is used to remove paint in some areas, and reveal other dry paint underneath, to create the layers he wants.

Sandia Peak I by Jack Roberts
acrylic on canvas, 50 x 50 inches
“I like to work freely and go where the paint takes me,” he said. “But, although I want my work to look spontaneous, each painting requires considerable thought, to make sure I achieve the proper composition and color relationships.”

Although Jack’s paintings are not referential, he does admit to being inspired by the many places he visits, from tropical islands to the landscapes of New Mexico and his hometown of Sedona. He also thinks back to personal experiences, and his perceptions of them, rather than the actual events. “Honanki” and “Sandia Peak 1” both speak to me of the Southwest.


Ryan Hale said his influences are the large color-field abstracts of Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko. But his unique body of work reflects his interest in how man-made materials and natural forms interact with each other. Some of his abstract paintings refer to aerial views of cities where these two elements co-exist. Sometimes, they work well together; and, as we know, at other times they clash. His painting entitled “Through the City” presents us with this conundrum.

Through the City by Ryan Hale,
acrylic on canvas 60 x 48 inches 
Forces of Nature by Ryan Hale
acrylic on canvas 60 x 48 inches 

After speaking with Ryan, I believe his artistic process is an introspective one. He can see a space where layers of old posters have been torn off and just remnants remain, take that mental reference and use it for a painting. He explains that “the textures and surfaces of a city wall after years of weather, repainting and painting over graffiti or various forms of damage, all stacked and layered through the filter of time, can be quite beautiful.”

The Forming Earth by Ryan Hale
acrylic on canvas, 36 x 36 inches
As for his techniques, Ryan uses acrylics and select glazes to produce translucent and opaque color layering. One of the reasons I like his work so much is his signature color: red! “The Forming Earth” is a good example of his skill with hues and his beautiful red.

Ryan said he works on several pieces at once. He’ll have general ideas for a painting, but they often change, especially since he works very fast, to convey movement and energy.  I think you can feel this energy in “The Forces of Nature.” Then, he’ll stop and think about the piece for a while before he changes or adds things. He said that he generally starts with darker hues, and then builds up to lighter ones, looking to see how the colors are flowing and working with each other.


Here and There by Ava Young,
Here and There by Ava Young,
mixed media on canvas, 40 x 30 inches
Ava Young is a mixed media artist who enjoys selecting different materials to layer and create paintings with interesting textures. “You have to be willing to be a mad scientist,” she said. And, referring to her passion for non-figurative art, she added, “Abstract painting allows me to invite viewers to venture away from their intellect and respond with the heart.”

Ava brings her interest in collage to her paintings. She works intuitively; starting with a base of molding paste mixed with such materials as dry wall powder or sand to create a ground of texture. Then, she adds other materials. “Here and There” was made with paper, sand, glass beads and metal wire. She paints first with acrylics, and adds a layer of oil paint to give a translucent finish.

Dancing Away by Ava Young
Dancing Away by Ava Young
mixed media on canvas, 30 x 40 inches
The open-ended process of abstract painting appeals to Ava. She adds and removes layers of paint (with alcohol or a magic eraser) to create a new set of textures and colors. “I just keep going until it seems right,” she says. “And, sometimes, I go back to a painting later and make more adjustments.” Her painting entitled “Dancing Away” required many hours of applications and removals.


Spontaneity, energy, emotions and a lack of boundaries seem to be at the heart of abstract painting. I think that’s why so many artists are drawn to this style of visual language.
Could I? Stay tuned!

View more art by Jack Roberts, Ryan Hale and Ava Young at Wilde Meyer Gallery.

Thursday, January 2, 2014

WILDE MEYER Celebrates 30 Years of Art

By Judy Feldman | www.wildemeyer.com

On November 7th, Wilde Meyer celebrated its 30th anniversary at its Marshall Way gallery with a party for clients, artists and “art walkers.” It was fun for me to meet some of the artists I’ve spoken with on the phone during blog interviews. I met Ka Fisher, Charles Davison and Chaille Trevor. Nancy Pendleton and Brian Boner also came for the occasion. Mark, Laura, Jonathan, Ryan, Tyler and Andrea were all there to chat with everyone while we enjoyed a delicious anniversary cake.

If you don’t already know, Wilde Meyer is named for owners Betty Wilde and Mark Meyer. Betty’s son Jonathan Henderson, also is a partner.

Since Betty wasn’t able to attend (she was at the WM party in Tucson), I decided to give her a call to congratulate her on this milestone and learn a little more about the gallery’s history. I didn’t know that Betty has a BFA in fine art, and that she had a gallery in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

In 1983, Betty and Mark came to Scottsdale and opened a gallery on Marshall Way, just across the street from their current location. They brought some artists’ work from Tulsa, but quickly, other artists applied to have their work exhibited. Over the years, the gallery has had several locations on Marshall Way. Betty said that their present location used to be a veterinarian and dog clinic. Instead of art walks, Thursday nights were for dog training classes! Wilde Meyer moved into this space in 1990. Wilde Meyer Annex, their other gallery in Scottsdale, has also had several previous locations, but has been at the Main Street site since 1997. It’s a fun place to shop, with colorful art, jewelry, gift items and some “arty”clothing.

Quite a few Wilde Meyer’s artists have been with the gallery for many years. Linda Carter Holman and Charles Davison have been represented here since its inception. Barbara Gurwitz came a little later. Sherri Belassan, Timothy Chapman, Ka Fisher, Alix Stefan and Nancy Pendleton have been showing their art here for 10 to 15 years. And, I’ve been with Wilde Meyer since 2006!

The year 2000 marked the opening of the beautiful Wilde Meyer gallery in Tucson. We artists are fortunate to have these three venues for our work to be displayed. And, sometimes, we’re featured on the walls of the Canyon Ranch Spa.

But no matter which locale you visit, you’ll find the contemporary, colorful art that characterizes Wilde Meyer. Whether it’s paintings that portray everything from landscapes to amazing chimpanzees or art glass, ceramics or sculpture, the recurring motif is quality art that pleases the eye.

Betty told me that owning art galleries is a fascinating endeavor, certainly not without its challenges. But she, Mark and Jonathan are looking forward to a bright future. “Both visitors and local residents in these two cities enjoy and support art, and we feel very fortunate to be in this business.”

Thursday, December 27, 2012

Big and Small

Can you think big and still paint small?

It’s time again for Wilde Meyer’s annual Gem Show, the show of smaller paintings by many of the gallery’s artists. For most of us, this is a change from our regular formats, and small paintings present their own challenges.

When I started thinking about my own paintings, large and small, and looking at some of the other participating artists, I began to consider that we tend to keep our same style and subject matter, but we have to make some changes to succeed in this smaller context. 

Time for a Walk, 11.5"x14.5" by Judy Feldman
Time for a Walk 11.5"x14.5" oil on canvas
by Judy Feldman


I love to paint interiors. I just finished one called “Interior with Red Chair.” But I couldn’t just shrink it! In my Gem Show painting, entitled “Time for a Walk.” I think I conveyed feeling of an inviting place, but with fewer elements. And, of course, the dog got smaller (by walking off the canvas!) With “A Christmas Surprise,” I purposely created a small image, focusing mainly on the new puppy in the box.

Bandit 4"x4" acrylic on canvas
by Ryan Hale
Ryan Hale finds small paintings challenging in a different way. Since he is an abstract artist, he likes to work freely and intuitively.

Ryan likes to interpret patterns of aerial views of landscapes. He’s fascinated by how land is divided, especially when seen from above, where civilization and nature both co-exist and collide. You can appreciate his intentions in these larger paintings entitled “Daily Intervals,” which measures 60”X72”, and “The Forming Earth,” which is 36”X36.”

So, when it came time to do some 12”X12” paintings, Ryan decided to work on several at once, so they would be related and could be hung together in different orientations. While he was painting them, he would move them around. “It’s a challenge, like creating a puzzle,” he said. “I takes a lot of thought to get a strong enough image on a small canvas.”

Structure IV 12"x12" acrylic on canvas
by Ryan Hale
I think these two small paintings, entitled “Structure III" and "Structure IV" are very successful. They reflect Ryan’s considered style and thoughtful color selections, and work well as a single unit or together. He also included a figurative painting, “Bandit,” which probably comes from another part of his creative brain!
Structure III 12"x12" acrylic on canvas
by Ryan Hale

Along the High Road oil on canvas 26"x41.75"
by Leigh Gusterson
Leigh Gusterson does beautiful expressionist paintings of the landscape around her Taos, New Mexico home. Often, a blue truck is driving through the vibrant scene, with a dog hanging out the back, such as “Along the High Road” (26”X41.75”) and “Fall Showers” (27”X27”). Her colors are delicious!
 
Taos Mountain Sunset  6.25"x9.25"
by Leigh Gusterson
Glorious Tree in Pilar 5.25"x9.25"
by Leigh Gusterson
Leigh also shares her love of the New Mexico landscape in her small paintings, but on a more intimate scale. In “Glorious Tree in Pilar,” we see Leigh’s truck journeying through the road, but we’re closer, and the flame red tree just pulls us into the 4”X 8” painting. I’m really impressed with “Rancho Sheep.” Leigh gets so much information in a tiny 4”X6” format, all in perfect proportion. “Taos Mountain Sunset”, a 5”X 8” painting, gives us the full beauty of the scene, yet we do feel closer to it than when we view her larger work.


Gem Show 2012
Gem Show 2012

You might be a bit overwhelmed when you see the wall of small paintings at the Gem Show. But it’s worth taking the time to look carefully, and ask Laura, Ryan or Jonathan to show the ones you like by themselves. It’s challenging to paint small, but the result is really a “gem!”

Gem Show 2012, miniature paintings
Gem Show 2012

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Tucson Rocks, Wilde Meyer Too!!

"Bad Boy Jacket: Cool"  mixed media on canvas 46"x46"
by Melinda Hall

"Seranade" oil on canvas 12"x12"
by Linda Carter Holman
Wilde Meyer Gallery presents our “Tucson Rocks” event, “Wilde Interpretations of Rock and Roll: The ‘50s to the Present,” a group art exhibition featuring art that captures the mood and feeling brought about by music and Rock showing October 6, 2011 through October 28, 2011.

"Tucson Rocks" is community-wide programming that celebrates "Who Shot Rock and Roll, A Photographic History" an exhibition opening at the Tucson Museum of Art on October 23, 2011.This exhibition originated at the Brooklyn Museum of Art and has traveled to several museums  across the country including Akron Art Museum in Ohio, Birmingham Museum of Art in Alabama, Columbia Museum of Art in South Carolina, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in Tennessee and others.  It's the first major museum exhibition to focus on the photographers who captured and portrayed Rock and Roll in photographs.



"Unplugged"  oil on canvas 20"x16"
by Connie Townsend
Just as Rock and Roll means different things to different people, artists at Wilde Meyer visualize their ideas through paintings.

Linda Carter Holman captures the festive mood as a singing guitarist travels with an audience of animal companions. 

For those who like art with humor, Trevor Mikula and Connie Townsend portray animals bearing musical instruments or wearing punk-rock outfits.  

Energetic paintings of people absorbed in a concert can be seen in the expressive scenes by Monika Rossa. 

Rock music’s effect on the body is shown in the beauty of dance, seen in stylized figure paintings by Sherri Belassen. 

Ryan Hale and Melinda Hall create paintings of paraphernalia and iconic objects of Rock in their still lives of guitars or leather jackets. 

Paintings by Bill Colt and Robert Ransom recall the early years of the rock and roll spirit in vintage caddies and hot rod roadsters.
 
“Wilde Interpretations of Rock and Roll: The ‘50s to the Present” opens on Thursday, October 6, 2011 at our gallery in Tucson and continues through October 29, 2011.

"Be There Or" reverse glass painting with vintage window 28"x30"
by Melinda Curtin
 

Monday, April 4, 2011

"Live in Color"


The latest show at Wilde Meyer, "Live in Color" opened on Thursday, March 31st and features new work by Sherri Belassen and Ryan Hale.

Left: Sherri Belassen  "At What Cost"  oil on canvas 60" x 36"
Right: Ryan Hale "Go West" acrylic on canvas  60" x 72"


Ryan creates his abstract paintings with drywall and palette knives, using mainly red and ochre tones. He pairs these colors against each other to see how they’ll interact. His work looks spontaneous, but, actually, he says he’s very methodical, applying his paint thoughtfully and changing directions as the piece comes together.

Ryan told me that he’s influenced by aerial photography! Plots of developed areas coinciding with undeveloped land, roads and buildings all inspire his geometric compositions. His painting entitled “Through the City” implies the congestion and energy of city life. My eyes rest on the white form in the center, but all around shapes are colliding.
Ryan Hale "Through the City" acrylic on canvas 60" x 48"

In “Building Up,” he contrasts organized linear “roads” with the chaos of free-floating patches of color.
Ryan Hale  "Building Up" acrylic on canvas  48" x 36"

Sherri paints with gusto and a free, yet strong style. Her work is all about the paint – the subject is there to help her explore and show many levels of colors and textures. For example, in “Splash” she uses large blocks of color to create interesting geometric shapes around the figure of a diver, whose body is defined by layers of paint scraped away to reveal another multitude of colors underneath.
Sherri Belassen  "Splash"  oil on canvas  48" x 30"

 It’s a very effective technique, used in most of her paintings.  Many of the titles of Sherri’s work convey irony and humor, as in “At What Cost."
Sherri Belassen  "At What Cost?" oil on canvas  60" x 36"
 

This is a strong show, with two painters who have contributed very interesting paintings.
Left: Ryan Hale  "Past Futures"  acrylic on canvas  36" x 72"
Right: Sherri Belassen "Olas Surfers" oil on canvas 36" x 48"

Left:  Ryan Hale  "Thoughts Abound"  Warming Day: I, II, III
(Right) Ryan Hale, 6 pieces: Warming Day: I, II, III  & Late Afternoon I, II, III

Sherri Belassen  "Play"  oil on canvas 48" x 72"


"Live in Color" continues through April 16, 2011.

Our next show will be at our gallery in Tucson: a group show featuring art by Alix Stefan, Robert Anderson, Sarah Webber, Michael Baum, Chaille Trevor and Judith D'Agostino called "Nature's Visual Poetry," opening on April 14, 2011, 5-7pm.